Case Studies

See our concept in action and you’ll know why it’s working! Choose one of the Case Studies from our offices around the world and watch interest become action. Click through the slides above for more detailed information


About our concept

Mediaplanet connects readers and advertisers through independent and inspiring theme media publications.  We find the topics that matter most to our readers, your future customers, in the areas of health, business & finance, lifestyle, technology and corporate social responsibility.

Our clients’ most common objectives when working with us are customer acquisition, brand awareness, lead generation and customer retention/loyalty.  To hear from some of our satisfied clients, see Testimonials.

Work with us and your advertisement is guaranteed to run in a relevant editorial environment, strategically tailored to ignite the reader to take action.  You’ll get the feel of a trade publication, but the reach of the daily press.

Want us to turn our millions of readers and viewers into your new customers?  Find the local office nearest you.

Identify a Knowledge Gap

Mediaplanet identifies niche topics that interest our readers and appeal to our clients—companies that have been, until now, unable to share such a targeted message with such a wide audience.


ABOUT “HEARING HEALTH,” CANADA

Hearing loss is often referred to as “the invisible handicap.”  Affecting sufferers gradually over time, it can be difficult to recognize and many may deny the seriousness of their symptoms. Due to this lack of understanding, it is widely undiagnosed nationwide—yet it is estimated that one in every 10 Canadians experiences hearing loss significant enough to warrant intervention. Other factors, such as an aging population and lack of public knowledge about causes and risks, mean this health issue is poised to become more prevalent than ever in the coming years.

Our goal was to promote awareness and increase prevention efforts, both for current sufferers and those at risk.  First, the reader was educated through a series of editorials highlighting the types of hearing loss, and their treatments. We also addressed the social implications and stigma of hearing loss through firsthand accounts of those living with the handicap. To top it off, we gave the issue a famous face—Oscar winner and Celebrity Apprentice contender Marlee Matlin shared her story of achieving success in acting despite growing up deaf, and chronicled her current work with the Starkey Foundation.

Hearing Health reached the Toronto Star’s daily circulation of 390, 163 copies and widespread readership of 1,186 000 readers. We also promoted it online through social media platforms, further connecting with our sponsors and contributors to spread the message of hearing health.  Many of our advertising participants were thrilled to align with our editorial vision—the consensus being that the topic had received little attention through mass media prior to our supplement.

Create the perfect editorial environment

We build a problem and solution based editorial environment, identifying the most common challenges our targeted audience faces. We work with industry leaders, well-known journalists and even celebrities to address these issues in our award-winning articles. We then allow our clients to advertise their relevant solutions.


ABOUT “HEARING HEALTH,” CANADA

Hearing loss is often referred to as “the invisible handicap.”  Affecting sufferers gradually over time, it can be difficult to recognize and many may deny the seriousness of their symptoms. Due to this lack of understanding, it is widely undiagnosed nationwide—yet it is estimated that one in every 10 Canadians experiences hearing loss significant enough to warrant intervention. Other factors, such as an aging population and lack of public knowledge about causes and risks, mean this health issue is poised to become more prevalent than ever in the coming years.

Our goal was to promote awareness and increase prevention efforts, both for current sufferers and those at risk.  First, the reader was educated through a series of editorials highlighting the types of hearing loss, and their treatments. We also addressed the social implications and stigma of hearing loss through firsthand accounts of those living with the handicap. To top it off, we gave the issue a famous face—Oscar winner and Celebrity Apprentice contender Marlee Matlin shared her story of achieving success in acting despite growing up deaf, and chronicled her current work with the Starkey Foundation.

Hearing Health reached the Toronto Star’s daily circulation of 390, 163 copies and widespread readership of 1,186 000 readers. We also promoted it online through social media platforms, further connecting with our sponsors and contributors to spread the message of hearing health.  Many of our advertising participants were thrilled to align with our editorial vision—the consensus being that the topic had received little attention through mass media prior to our supplement.

Choose the right distribution channels

We distribute our reports through the newspaper partner with the audience that best aligns with our targeted demographic. In addition, we print extra copies to distribute at relevant conferences and events, and circulate the report online via our partners and clients’ websites, newsletters, press releases, social media and more.


ABOUT “HEARING HEALTH,” CANADA

Hearing loss is often referred to as “the invisible handicap.”  Affecting sufferers gradually over time, it can be difficult to recognize and many may deny the seriousness of their symptoms. Due to this lack of understanding, it is widely undiagnosed nationwide—yet it is estimated that one in every 10 Canadians experiences hearing loss significant enough to warrant intervention. Other factors, such as an aging population and lack of public knowledge about causes and risks, mean this health issue is poised to become more prevalent than ever in the coming years.

Our goal was to promote awareness and increase prevention efforts, both for current sufferers and those at risk.  First, the reader was educated through a series of editorials highlighting the types of hearing loss, and their treatments. We also addressed the social implications and stigma of hearing loss through firsthand accounts of those living with the handicap. To top it off, we gave the issue a famous face—Oscar winner and Celebrity Apprentice contender Marlee Matlin shared her story of achieving success in acting despite growing up deaf, and chronicled her current work with the Starkey Foundation.

Hearing Health reached the Toronto Star’s daily circulation of 390, 163 copies and widespread readership of 1,186 000 readers. We also promoted it online through social media platforms, further connecting with our sponsors and contributors to spread the message of hearing health.  Many of our advertising participants were thrilled to align with our editorial vision—the consensus being that the topic had received little attention through mass media prior to our supplement.

The reader is ignited to take action

By matching the right topic with the right distribution channel, and crafting the right articles for the right demographics, we’ve successfully converted our readers and viewers into customers. We’ve turned interest into action.


ABOUT “HEARING HEALTH,” CANADA

Hearing loss is often referred to as “the invisible handicap.”  Affecting sufferers gradually over time, it can be difficult to recognize and many may deny the seriousness of their symptoms. Due to this lack of understanding, it is widely undiagnosed nationwide—yet it is estimated that one in every 10 Canadians experiences hearing loss significant enough to warrant intervention. Other factors, such as an aging population and lack of public knowledge about causes and risks, mean this health issue is poised to become more prevalent than ever in the coming years.

Our goal was to promote awareness and increase prevention efforts, both for current sufferers and those at risk.  First, the reader was educated through a series of editorials highlighting the types of hearing loss, and their treatments. We also addressed the social implications and stigma of hearing loss through firsthand accounts of those living with the handicap. To top it off, we gave the issue a famous face—Oscar winner and Celebrity Apprentice contender Marlee Matlin shared her story of achieving success in acting despite growing up deaf, and chronicled her current work with the Starkey Foundation.

Hearing Health reached the Toronto Star’s daily circulation of 390, 163 copies and widespread readership of 1,186 000 readers. We also promoted it online through social media platforms, further connecting with our sponsors and contributors to spread the message of hearing health.  Many of our advertising participants were thrilled to align with our editorial vision—the consensus being that the topic had received little attention through mass media prior to our supplement.